Events

6:00PM -The Dome of the Science Museum of Virginia, Richmond
Thursday, October 18, 2018

                                                          Socrates on Death Row

 

Presented by the Richmond Society

Of the Archaeological Institute of America

Thursday, October 18, 6:00 p.m.

The Dome of the Science Museum of Virginia

2500 W. Broad Street, Richmond, VA

 

 

Find yourself immersed in the trial, imprisonment, and execution of Socrates in Athens in 399 B.C.E.   Sit back in the comfort of the planetarium of the Science Museum, and let the places, people, and moments of that event envelop you.  Professor Robert Garland and Joseph Eakin of Colgate University and their colleagues and students have created an entrancing reenactment – through digital figures, real actors, digital artefacts, and authentic reproductions of Athenian buildings, with texts faithful to the Platonic Dialogues.

This remarkable program was designed for the Ho Tung Planetarium at Colgate University, and the Richmond Society of the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to be able to present it also at the planetarium of the Science Museum in Richmond.   Please come join us for this unique opportunity.

Our offering of Socrates on Death Row is being sponsored by the Richmond Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, The Department of Classical Studies and the Cultural Affairs Committee of the University of Richmond, and the Departments of Philosophy and Classics at the University of Virginia.

Robert Garland is The Roy D. and Margaret B. Wooster Professor of the Classics, and Joseph Eakin is the Technical Director and Designer of the Ho Tung Visualization Lab/Planetarium, and both will give short talks and respond to questions.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/socrates-on-death-row-film-and-discussion-tickets-49270895575?aff=es2

 

5:00PM 1st Floor Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Earthquakes, Etruscan Priests, and Roman Politics in the Age of Cicero

5:00PM 1st Floor Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
Thursday, November 15, 2018

'Greek Chariot Racing: A Sport for Kings (and Queens)'

Ancient chariot racing was thrilling, violent, and frequently lethal. For Greek spectators its drama enmeshed them in a cycle of hope, anxiety, terror, then elation or despair as the favored team might win, place, or crash. So popular was chariot racing within the Roman empire that it enjoyed imperial sponsorship and evolved into the team sport essential for entertainment for the masses (the circus part of “bread and circuses”). But within the Greek city-states it had a different trajectory: it was as the sport of privilege that it came to be embedded within civic and political institutions throughout the Greek world until the end of antiquity. This paper traces the course of chariot racing as it first manifests itself in Homer, the significance of its formal inclusion within the Olympic games (particularly for Sparta and later the Ptolemies), and finally how it was adapted by an Athenian democracy. 

5:00PM 1st Floor Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
Tuesday, March 19, 2019
TBA
Saturday, March 23, 2019
TBA
Tuesday, March 26, 2019 to Thursday, March 28, 2019
5:00PM 1st Floor Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
Monday, April 8, 2019
5:00PM 1st Floor Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
Monday, April 15, 2019
1st Floor Cocke Hall, Gibson Room
Thursday, May 9, 2019 to Saturday, May 11, 2019