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Courses

I. CLASSICS: CLASSICS COURSES IN TRANSLATION.

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CLAS 2020 | ROMAN CIVILIZATION

Mr. Hays (bgh2n)

DAY & TIME
TR 1400-1515 +DISCUSSIONS

DESCRIPTION

This course serves as a general introduction to the history, literature, social life, institutions, and ideology of ancient Rome, from its origins to the 2nd century AD.  We will look especially at the ways in which the Romans constructed a collective cultural identity for themselves, with attention paid also to groups marginal to or excluded from that identity (enslaved people, women, Greeks and other foreigners).  Readings will focus on the ancient texts and sources, including the comedies of Plautus, historical writing by Sallust, Vergil’s epic poem The Aeneid, the love poetry of Ovid, letters by Seneca and Pliny, and Petronius’s raucous novel Satyrica.  Requirements include a midterm and final exam and several short papers.


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CLAS 2040 | GREEK MYTHOLOGY

Ms. Petrovic (ip3k)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1000-1050 +DISCUSSIONS



DESCRIPTION

An introduction to the weird and wonderful world of ancient Greek and Roman myths: We will read and analyze the stories about gods and heroes in selected Greek and Roman literary texts, we will look into the way these myths have been interpreted and reshaped through reception from Antiquity to the modern age and will also survey the modern theoretical approaches to the study of myths (historical, religious, psychological, anthropological, etc.) 

Quizzes, short writing assignments, midterm, final examination.


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CLAS 2559 | GREEK & ROMAN SCIENCE, ENGINEERING, & MEDICINE

Mr. Dillery (jdd4n)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1500-1550

DESCRIPTION

This course will focus on the development of Greek science from the Archaic to the Roman periods (700 BC–­AD 300). Topics that will be examined in detail will include medicine and disease, biology, physics, mathematics, and technology and invention. There will be a midterm, final, and final paper.


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CLAS 3350 | LANGUAGE & LITERATURE OF THE EARLY CELTS

Mr. George (chg4n)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1400-1450

DESCRIPTION

This introduction to the Celtic inhabitants of Gaul and the British Isles interweaves two approaches, one linguistic, one literary. First, we will explore how the Celtic languages work, focusing on the basics of Old Irish—which includes such exotic features as initial mutations and conjugated prepositions—but also finishing off with some Middle Welsh. Second, we will compare writings about the Celts found in Ancient Greek and Latin authors with readings of Celtic literature in translation, notably Ireland’s closest equivalent to the Iliad, the Táin Bó Cúailnge, whose Achilles-like hero Cú Chulainn undergoes a monstrous transformation (called the “warp-spasm” by one translator) when he fights: “He sucked one eye so deep into his head that a wild crane couldn’t probe it onto his cheek out of the depths of his skull; the other eye fell out along his cheek.”

II. GREEKS:

Courses in Greek language and literature, and in Greek art, ideas, history, and other aspects of Greek civilization.

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GREE 1020 | ELEMENTARY GREEK II

Mr. Petrovic (ap2bd)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1000-1050 +DISCUSSIONS


DESCRIPTION

In this class the student will complete the study of Elementary Greek, finishing the textbook (Chase and Philips) and begin to read passages of connected Greek.


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GREE 2020 | INTERMEDIATE GREEK II

Ms. Kuin (ik6mg)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1300-1350

DESCRIPTION

In the fourth semester of Greek, we venture forth beyond Attic prose for the first time. We begin with selections from the Histories of Herodotus, who pioneered historical and ethnographic inquiry in easy-going Ionic Greek. Afterwards, as an introduction to the language of Greek tragedy, we will read (most of) Euripides’ Medea, with its tense portrayal of a woman playing the part of a brilliant yet terrifying hero. Particular attention will be devoted to issues of grammar, syntax, meter, and style. Students will complete quizzes, exams featuring unseen passages, short composition assignments, and a final essay.


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GREE 2240 | NEW TESTAMENT II

Ms. Spittler (jes9cu)

DAY & TIME
MW 1400-1515

DESCRIPTION

In this course we will read a variety of early Christian texts composed between the first and fifth centuries CE. Readings include selections from Paul's letters, the canonical book of Acts, and various apocryphal texts. Students will begin to develop paleographic skills (reading directly from digitized manuscripts) and become familiar with a range of digital resources. Grammar review as necessary, and some Greek composition (just for fun).


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GREE 3040 | ADVANCED READING IN GREEK

Mr. George (chg4n)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1000-1050

DESCRIPTION

In this course we will be reading a selection of Books from Homer’s Odyssey. Issues of oral poetics, oral composition, archaic society and history will be stressed. Midterm, final, and final paper.


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GREE 8100 | GREEK RELIGION

Mr. Petrovic (ap2bd)

DAY & TIME
MW 1400-1515

DESCRIPTION

The course will bring participants up to speed with current trends in scholarship on Greek religion. Special topics include rites of passage, sacrifice, purity and pollution, divination and oracles, and magic. We will read and analyze a wide range of literary (poetry, drama, philosophy) and epigraphic sources in Greek (especially ritual norms), as well as relevant scholarship.

There will be tests, a midterm examination, presentations (weekly 5 minutes presentations and one 30 minutes talk, fully written-out, and submitted one week before presentation, along with a structured handout); a final exam or a paper (5000-6000 words), due by the end of May 2024.


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GREE 8130 | GREEK LITERARY CRITICISM

Ms. Arthur-Montagne (JAMontagne)

DAY & TIME
TR 1400-1515

DESCRIPTION

How did the Greeks read, evaluate, and interpret their own literature? This seminar will survey foundational works and themes of ancient Greek literary criticism from the Classical to Imperial periods. Although our readings will focus primarily on prose authors (Plato, Aristotle, Demetrius, Longinus), the syllabus will include some selections of poetry that have become central to scholarship in Greek criticism and poetics (Xenophanes fr. KD 21b11, Aristophanes’ Frogs 907ff). We will also work to acquaint ourselves with the robust terminology for Greek literary criticism, such as mimesis, energeia, and huponoia. Course participants may choose between a final exam or final paper project at the conclusion of the semester.

III. ROMANS:

Courses in the Latin language and Roman literature, and in Roman art, ideas, history, and other aspects of Roman civilization.

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LATI 1020 | ELEMENTARY LATIN II

Mr. Miller (jfm4j)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1200-1250 +DISCUSSIONS


DESCRIPTION

This course is a continuation of Latin 1010. We shall finish covering the basic principles of Latin grammar and syntax through elementary exercises in comprehension and composition. The course also includes frequent illustrated lectures highlighting various aspects of the literature and culture of ancient Rome. We conclude the semester reading unadapted passages of Latin prose and poetry from Roman antiquity. The course prepares the student to enter Latin 2010.


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LATI 2010 | INTERMEDIATE LATIN I


DAY & TIME
Ms. Myers (ksm8m)
MWF 1100-1150
Mr. Hamilton (cdh5cu)
MWF 1200-1250


DESCRIPTION

Readings from Ovid’s poem Metamorphoses, including the stories of Daedalus and Icarus and Apollo and Daphne, and from Nepos’ biography of Hannibal the Carthaginian general. Grammar review as necessary, and some Latin composition.


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LATI 2020 | INTERMEDIATE LATIN II

DAY & TIME
Mr. Celotto (gc4fw)
MWF 0900-0950
MWF 1100-1150
Ms. Kuin (ik6mg)
MWF 1200-1250

DESCRIPTION

In this course you will continue your study of Latin through the translation of ancient authors in prose and poetry. This class will focus on reading the works of Cicero and Catullus. Students in this course must have completed Intermediate Latin I (2010) with a minimum grade of D-. Successful completion of this course will complete the Intermediate Latin sequence, and meet the language requirement for the College of Arts & Sciences. 


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LATI 3030 | CICERO

Mr. George (chg4n)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1100-1150

DESCRIPTION

Everyone remembers that Caesar was assassinated on the Ides of March, 44 BC. But what happened afterwards? In this class we’ll read two important speeches of Cicero’s, the first two Philippics, composed later that year when the orator was growing increasingly alarmed at the actions of Mark Anthony in the aftermath of Caesar’s death. We’ll consider in the course how these works not only shed light on a historically crucial period, but also represent the pinnacle of Cicero’s oratorical prowess, as noted already by no less a critic than Juvenal.


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LATI 3160 | LUCRETIUS

Mr. Celotto (gc4fw)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1400-1450

DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to introduce you to Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura. The goal of this didactic poem is to explain Epicurean philosophy to a Roman audience. Lucretius focuses on topics such as the principles of atomism, the nature of the soul, and the functioning of sensation. In this course we will engage in close reading of some of the most famous and significant passages of the poem. Particular attention will be devoted to issues of grammar, syntax, meter, and style.


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LATI 4110 | OVID, FASTI

Mr. Miller (jfm4j)

DAY & TIME
MWF 1000-1050

DESCRIPTION

This advanced course will study Ovid’s calendar-poem, Fasti, which presents festivals and star-myths for six months of the year (January through June). This work of late Ovid (written both before and after his exile) offers the opportunity to study a literary response to Rome’s religious calendar and its imperial remaking in the age of Augustus. In class we will translate and discuss the poem from a literary and historical point of view and will also look at selected scholarly discussions and some comparative Latin texts (Livy, Virgil, Horace, and fragments of surviving Roman calendars).

Writing assignments, line-report, presentation of class project, final exam.


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LATI 5200 | OVID, METAMORPHOSES

Ms. Myers (ksm8m)

DAY & TIME
MW 1530-1645

DESCRIPTION

The focus of this course is Ovid’s Metamorphoses. We will read large sections of the poem closely, with an alertness to matters of translation, meter, style, allusion, genre, poetics, arrangement, and cultural and political context. We will consider Ovid’s Greek and Latin models, as well as his influence on later Latin literature. Attention will also be placed on introducing the students to the major research tools of Classicists. Weekly topics and secondary scholarship will also be assigned and discussed. Students will be expected to translate and scan in class, deliver article reports, line reports, commentaries, and participate in discussion.


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LATI 5559 | TRANSLATING HORACE

Mr. Hays (bgh2n)

DAY & TIME
MW 1530-1645

DESCRIPTION

Translation is an activity basic to the study of the Classics. We all regularly engage in it, but we rarely reflect on it as such. In this course we will read individual poems by Horace in Latin (mostly, but not exclusively, from the Odes). We will then look at various English translations and adaptations of the same poems in light of translation theory (ancient and modern). Some questions to be posed: What constitutes a "faithful" (or "unfaithful") translation? In what ways and to what degree do translations reflect their own eras? How do poets' translations fit within their own oeuvre and in relation to their independent works? How can translations bring out aspects of the original we might not otherwise have been aware of? We will also give some attention to Horace himself as a translator. Requirements will include several practical exercises in translation as well as a substantial paper. This course is open to undergraduates who have already taken at least one 4000-level Latin class, and to graduate students in other fields with a working knowledge of Latin and some experience reading Latin poetry.

IV. AFFILIATED COURSES:

Courses presenting Classical studies in relation to other subjects.

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ARAH 9505 | ARCHAEOLOGIES OF MEMORY IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN

Ms. Kreindler (waf5tg)

DAY & TIME
T 1700-1900

DESCRIPTION
The past is not a monolithic entity; ancient peoples were aware that they inhabited places that had been constructed and occupied by their predecessors. Moreover, they engaged with the material remains of past peoples, and such materials fundamentally influenced their present lives. This class will explore “the past in the past,” examining how social, or collective memory, specifically those centered on particular materials, helped define various Greek and Roman identities. This course will explore how materials were created to influence social memories, as both Greeks and Romans were attuned to the power of materiality to shape collective memory. It also will examine how social memory was mutable, as people perceive, conceptualize, remember, and forget in different ways. Lastly, this course will interrogate how memories of the past exist in the present, influencing both modern scholarship and political agendas.


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ARTH 1503 | ART AND POWER

Ms. Kreindler (waf5tg)

DAY & TIME
MW 1200-1250

DESCRIPTION
In antiquity, those with power skillfully utilized art and architecture to communicate their authority to pre-literate societies. Many of these works, like the Great Pyramids at Giza and the Athenian Parthenon, are evocative, enduring, and still recognizable. This course will adopt a comparative approach, covering materials from across the Old World, to explore how different cultures communicated authority to the masses. Chronologically, this course will cover materials that span the Bronze Age to 400 CE, approximately when three great empires, the Roman, the Gupta, and the Han, came to an end. These works of art and architecture will come from a broad geographic area, including the Middle East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, India, and China. Additionally, this course will explore how monuments to power have influenced later cultures and continue to influence our own society.


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ARTH 2053 | GREEK ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

Ms. Smith (tjs6e)

DAY & TIME
TR 1100-1215

DESCRIPTION
The vase painting, sculpture, and other arts of the Greeks, from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic periods. Works are studied in their social, political, and religious contexts with a special focus on archaeology and material culture.


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ARTH 4591 | THE PARTHENON

Ms. Smith (tjs6e)

DAY & TIME
M 1530-1800

DESCRIPTION
This seminar focuses on the Parthenon as both architectural structure and cultural icon. The monument will be studied in terms of its historical and political circumstances, as well as its setting and religious function. Various interpretations of its sculptural program will be reviewed, as will the cultural property debate and both public and scholarly reactions to the new Acropolis Museum. Students will write a series of short response papers, a lengthy term paper, and will give a least one oral presentation. Some ancient Greek texts will be read in translation.


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DEM 7500 | DEMOCRACY AND LITERACY

Ms. Arthur-Montagne (hvk9ks)
Ms. Richardson (dwc7rm)

DAY & TIME
W 1400-1630

DESCRIPTION
This graduate-level seminar explores the practices of education and democracy in the ancient Mediterranean and medieval Middle East. Studying democracy transregionally in the premodern period, we question the relationship between literacy and effective participation in democratic society. This course also examines the development of early legal cultures, print technologies and the rise of “fake news,” the creation of a public sphere through civic, media, and digital literacies. The fall semester will be focused on establishing the historical and theoretical foundations for understanding these questions through a range of readings and short interpretive writing assignments. By the end of this semester, students will have developed a research prospectus for the project they wish to pursue. During the Spring semester, students will carry out these research projects and workshop them as we more broadly explore the question of how best to communicate scholarly work. We will learn about the mechanics and best practices for successfully presenting at conferences and publishing peer-reviewed articles and books, as well as exploring forms of public scholarship including writing for newspapers and magazines, digital projects, podcasts, community engagement and collaborative research, and dialogue with policymakers. The final version of student projects can take any of these forms or combine different forms of communication. We will also collectively develop a culminating event to be held in April 2024 to showcase the work produced in the course.


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HIEU 2031 | AN INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ANCIENT GREECE

Ms. Meyer (eam2n)

DAY & TIME
MW 1100-1150 + Discussion

DESCRIPTION
History of Ancient Greece from the Homeric period to the death of Alexander the Great. Development of the city-state, Athenian democracy, and the nature of Greek politics; the conflict between Greece and Persia, and between Sparta and the Athenian naval empire; consequences of the latter conflict--the Peloponnesian War--for subsequent Greek history; finally, the Macedonian conquest of Greece and Persia. Lecture and weekly discussions; midterm, final, seven-page paper, and occasional quizzes in section. Readings will average between 100 and 125 pages a week, to be taken from the following (students are not responsible--for exam purposes--for the entirety of any of these, although they will have to read all of either Herodotus or Thucydides for the paper):

  • The Landmark Herodotus (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)
  • The Landmark Thucydides (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)
  • Plutarch, Greek Lives (Oxford)
  • Plato, The Apology of Socrates (Hackett)
  • J. M. Moore, Aristotle and Xenophon on Democracy and Oligarchy (California)
  • S. Pomeroy et al., Ancient Greece (textbook: edition to be determined)
  • a xerox packet (available at NK Print and Design on Elliewood Avenue)

 


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HIEU 3041 | THE FALL OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

Ms. Meyer (eam2n)

DAY & TIME
MW 1400-1515

DESCRIPTION
This upper-level lecture class assumes a basic knowledge of Roman history but has no prerequisites. It will cover the most tumultuous period in Roman history, that which stretches from 133 BC to the establishment of Octavian (Augustus) as the first emperor in 27 BC. This was the age of the great generals (Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar); of great oratory (Cicero), of amazing changes in the city of Rome itself, in Italy, and in the ever-growing provinces; an age of shifting political alliances, howling crowds, and the eventual transformation of a Republic into a monarchy. How did this come about? Could the Republic maintain an empire, or was the dominance of one man unavoidable? We will read mostly primary sources in translation, averaging about 140 pages a week; there will be ten in-class discussions, a midterm, a final, one 5-6 page paper, and one 7-10 page paper. Reading will be drawn from:

  • H. H. Scullard, From the Gracchi to Nero (fifth edition, 1982/new foreword 2011)
  • Plutarch, Makers of Rome and The Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin)
  • Sallust, Jugurthine War and Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin, transl. Woodman, 2007)
  • Julius Caesar, Civil Wars and Gallic War (Oxford)
  • M. Tullius Cicero, On Government and Selected Political Speeches (Penguin)
  • and a course packet

Note: graduate students are welcome to take this class as HIEU 9025, a "graduate tutorial" in the History Department. We will have extra meetings and extra readings, and the final paper will be longer and more professional. Meeting times will be geared to everyone's convenience.


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PHIL 2110 | HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL

Mr. Secada (jes2f)

DAY & TIME
MW 1400-1450 +Discussion

DESCRIPTION
This course is an introduction to the history of philosophy from its beginnings in the Greek colonies of Asia Minor to the end of the Middle Ages. You will find a comprehensive summary of the history of philosophy during this period in one of the required readings. You will also be asked to read a number of primary texts, which will provide material for the discussion sections. During the lecture sessions, we survey some of this history and will closely read two texts, by Plato (Phaedrus) and by Anselm of Canterbury (Proslogion). We may also read closely a few early sections from Aquinas’s Summa of Theology. We will focus on the philosophical content of the texts but will also pay some attention to relevant historical and cultural context.


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PHIL 5510 | PLATO

Mr. McCready-Flora (icm5h)

DAY & TIME
M 1300-1530

DESCRIPTION
Close reading, in translation, of two or three of Plato’s most demanding and philosophically-rich dialogues and state-of-the-art scholarship about them. Open to both graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Possible dialogues include: Theaetetus, Sophist, Philebus, Parmenides, Republic, Laws, Phaedrus, Timaeus and Cratylus.

V. SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND EVENTS

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The Arthur F. Stocker Lectureship

The Arthur F. Stocker Endowment Fund for Classical Lectures was established in 1984 by the colleagues, friends, and former students of Arthur F. Stocker, a longtime member of the Department, in recognition of his contributions to the field of Classics. The Endowment supports an annual lecture by a distinguished visiting scholar on a topic related to Latin literature or culture.

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The James S. Constantine Lectureship

The James S. Constantine annual lectureship was established in 1987 by the colleagues, friends, and former students of James S. Constantine, a longtime member of the Department, in recognition of his contributions to the teaching and study of the Classics. Every fall a distinguished visiting scholar delivers a lecture on a topic related to Greek literature or culture.


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Margaret Lowe Annual Memorial Undergraduate Lecture

A memorial lecture series endowed by Drs. Sandy and Whitson Lowe honoring the memory of their daughter, Margaret Helen Lowe. Margaret died tragically and unexpectedly at the beginning of her fourth year of study as Greek Major in 2015. Having had enough credits in order to graduate, at the Final Exercises in 2016, Margaret was awarded her BA degree posthumously. This annual talk reminds us and our future Classics students of Margaret’s kind and generous spirit and her love for Classics.


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The Classics Graduate Student Colloquium

Each year the graduate students of the Department of Classics sponsor a colloquium, at which graduate students from the University of Virginia and other universities, and a distinguished senior scholar, present papers on a selected theme.

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Tuesday Luncheons

At Tuesday Luncheons during the academic year, students, faculty of the Classics Department, and other persons with classical interests hear and discuss papers relevant to the Classics. Those interested in attending should contact John Miller (jfm4j@virginia.edu).

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The Virginia Senior Classical League

The Virginia Senior Classical League is a statewide organization of college students who are interested in the ancient world. The VSCL assists the Virginia Junior Classical League at the VJCL Convention each fall. Each year the VSCL also runs two Certamina (academic competitions for high school Latin students) for the VJCL. Students interested in joining should consult the League website at http://vscl.webs.com/

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The Classics Club at UVA

The purpose of the Classics Club is to promote community both among Classics Majors and other interested undergraduates through the facilitation of educational, social, and service-related activities. For further information send an e-mail to: classicsclub@virginia.edu.

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The Archaeological Institute of America

The Archaeological Institute of America is an educational and scientific society of archaeologists and others interested in archaeological study and research. There is a chapter of the AIA in Charlottesville, and those interested in joining should contact Professor John Dobbins. The AIA sponsors a series of lectures, which are free and open to the public.